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    Mycobacterium avium subsp. Paratuberculosis K-10

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. Paratuberculosis K-10

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis is a gram-positive, non-spore forming, non-motile, slightly curved, aerobic, slow-growing pathogenic bacteria in the genus Mycobacteria. Often referred to as Map, it causes Johne's disease in cattle and other ruminants, and it has long been suspected as a causative agent in Crohn's disease in humans; this connection is controversial. Map, like most mycobacteria, is difficult to treat. It is not susceptible to anti-tuberculosis drugs (which can generally kill Mycobacterium tuberculosis), but can only be treated with a combination of antibiotics such as Rifabutin and a macrolide such as Clarithromycin. Treatment regimes can last years. The Mycobacterium avium subsp. Paratuberculosis K-10 genome was sequenced in 2005 by The University of Minnesota and has a total of 4350 genes.

    Mycobacterium bovis AF2122/97

    Mycobacterium bovis AF2122/97

    Mycobacterium bovis causes tuberculosis mainly in cattle but has a broad host range and causes disease similar to that caused by M. tuberculosis in humans. It belongs to the M. tuberculosis complex (MTBC) that comprises the closely related human pathogens M. tuberculosis and M. africanum. Identification of M. bovis traditionally has been based on clear-cut differences in phenotypic characteristics and biochemical properties when compared to the other members of the MTBC. M. bovis shows a dysgonic colony shape on Lowenstein-Jensen medium, is negative for niacin accumulation and nitrate reduction, is susceptible to thiophene-2-carboxylic acid hydrazide (TCH), and shows microaerophilic growth on Lebek medium. The Mycobacterium bovis AF2122/97 genome was sequenced by the Sanger Institute and Institut Pasteur and has a total of 3920 genes.

    Mycobacterium bovis BCG str. Pasteur 1173P2

    Mycobacterium bovis BCG str. Pasteur 1173P2

    Mycobacterium bovis BCG is a gram-positive, chemoorganotrophic, non-spore forming, non-motile, slightly curved, aerobic, slow-growing bacterium. It is the causative agent of tuberculosis in cattle and other animals, including buffalo, lions and antelopes. The organism can also cause tuberculosis in humans. Its genome is 99.95 percent identical to that of M. tuberculosis. The Mycobacterium bovis BCG str. Pasteur 1173P2genome was sequenced by Institut Pasteur and has a total 3952 genes.

    Mycobacterium leprae TN

    Mycobacterium leprae TN

    Mycobacterium leprae is a gram-positive, aerobic rod surrounded by the characteristic waxy coating unique to Mycobacteria. It was discovered in 1873 when Gerhard Henrik Armauer Hansen demonstrated that rod-shaped bodies were directly related to the nodules of leprosy patients. Leprosy, or Hansen's disease, is chronically infectious and primarily a granulomatous disease of the peripheral nerves, mucosa of the upper respiratory tract, and produces skin lesions. If left untreated, there can be progressive and permanent damage to the skin, nerves, limbs and eyes. Contrary to the common popular conception of the illness, it does not cause body parts to simply fall off, and it differs from tzaraath, the malady described in the Hebrew scriptures and previously translated into English as leprosy. Effective treatment for leprosy appeared in the late 1940s with the introduction of dapsone and its derivatives. However, leprosy bacilli resistant to dapsone gradually appeared and became widespread, and it was not until the introduction of multidrug therapy (MDT) in the early 1980s that the disease could be diagnosed and treated successfully within the community. The Mycobacterium leprae TN genome was sequenced by the Sanger Institute and Institut Pasteur and has a total of 1,605 genes.

    Mycobacterium sp. KMS

    Mycobacterium sp. KMS

    Mycobacterium KMS was isolated from soil in a wood preservative-contaminated land-treatment unit where remediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) was occurring. It is an acid-fast, obligate aerobic, non-motile, rod-shaped bacterium. The Mycobacterium sp. KMS genome was sequenced by the US DOE Joint Genome Institute and has a total of 5460 genes.

    Mycobacterium sp. MCS

    Mycobacterium sp. MCS

    Mycobacterium sp. MCS was isolated from soil in a wood preservative-contaminated land-treatment unit where remediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) was occurring. This isolate belongs to a fast-growing group of the mycobacterium genus that is defined as Gram-positive, acid-fast, pleomorphic, non-motile rods belonging to the order Actinomycetales and characterized by distinctive cell surface mycolic acid derivatives. In contrast, members of the slow-growing group of Mycobacteria have notoriety in causing human and animal diseases. The Mycobacterium sp. MCS genome was sequenced by the US DOE Joint Genome Institute and has a total of 5194 genes.

    Mycobacterium marinum

    Mycobacterium marinum

    M. marinum, a pathogen of fish and amphibians, is a close relative of M. tuberculosis, the etiologic agent of tuberculosis in humans. Analysis of the M. marinum genome reveals genome downsizing and lateral gene transfer in M. tuberculosis that allowed it to become a specialized pathogen of humans and primates, and facilitates better understanding of tuberculosis disease. M. marinum was sequenced by the Sanger Center and Monash University, and has 5424 genes.

    Mycobacterium smegmatis MC2155

    Mycobacterium smegmatis MC2155

    Mycobacterium smegmatis MC2155 is an aerobic, chemoorganotroph, rod-shaped, nonmotile, human pathogen. This bacterium was initially isolated from human smegma. It is associated with soft tissue lesions following trauma or surgery. It is also reported as a possible factor in penile carcinogenesis. This strain (MC2 155) is a mutant of M. smegmatis. It was isolated in 1990. Unlike other strains of this species, MC2 can be 10 to 100 thousand times more efficiently transformed with plasmid vectors using electroporation than the parental strain and thus is invaluable in analysis of mycobacterial gene function, expression and replication. The Mycobacterium smegmatis MC2155 genome was sequenced by TIGR and has a total of 6716.

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis CDC1551

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis CDC1551

    In 1996 TIGR was the recipient of a grant from the NIH to sequence the 4.4 Mb genome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. While a similar project was underway to sequence the laboratory strain (H37Rv) at the Sanger Center, TIGR chose to sequence a recent clinical isolate from the Kentucky/Tennessee region. This strain (often referred to as the "Oshkosh" strain, but more properly CDC-1551) was isolated from a male children's clothing factory worker and was shown to be highly contagious, infecting approximately 80% of his co-workers and social contacts. The CDC-1551 strain was also demonstrated to be highly virulent in mice, producing several orders of magnitude more organisms than the H37Rv strain when inoculated into the lungs of mice. Fortunately, the strain has not caused wide-spread disease in man and is pan-drug sensitive. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis CDC1551 genome was sequenced by TIGR and has a total of 4189 genes. The genome is a circular chromosome of 4,403,765 base pairs with an average G + C content of 65.6%.

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis F11 (ExPEC)

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis F11 (ExPEC)

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis F11 strain is an aerobic, chemoorganotroph, rod-shaped, nonmotile, nonsporulating human pathogen. It was isolated in Tuberculosis patients during a TB epidemic in the Western Cape of South Africa The Mycobacterium tuberculosis F11 genome was sequenced by The Broad Institute and has a total of 3941 genes.

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis C

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis C

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis C strain, an aerobic, chemoorganotrophic, non-sporulating, rod-shaped, non-motile human pathogen has been highly transmitted in New York City, were it was first isolated. In one study this strain was found to be more common among injection drug users and resistant to reactive nitrogen intermediates. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis C genome was sequenced by The Broad Institute and has a total of 3851 genes.

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis Haarlem

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis Haarlem

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis Haarlem is an aerobic, chemoorganotrophic, rod-shaped, Nonmotile human Pathogen that causes Tuberculosis. Members of the Haarlem family of M. tuberculosis strains have been found in many parts of the world. The first representative of the family was discovered in Haarlem, The Netherlands. The identified strain is MDR and has rapidly expanded within immunocompetent and non-hospitalized patients. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis Haarlem genome was sequenced by The Broad Institute and has a total of 3866 genes.

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv is a pathogenic, aerobic, chemoorganotroph, rod-shaped, non-motile bacteria that causes Tuberculosis. The complete genome sequence of the best-characterized strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, H37Rv, has been determined and analyzed in order to improve our understanding of the biology of this slow-growing pathogen and to help the conception of new prophylactic and therapeutic interventions. The genome comprises 4,411,532 base pairs, contains around 4,000 genes, and has a very high guanine + cytosine content that is reflected in the biased amino-acid content of the proteins. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv genome was sequenced by TIGR and has a total of 3999 genes.

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv (Broad)

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv (Broad)

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv is a pathogenic, aerobic, chemoorganotroph, rod-shaped, non-motile bacteria that causes Tuberculosis. The complete genome sequence of the best-characterized strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, H37Rv, has been determined and analyzed in order to improve our understanding of the biology of this slow-growing pathogen and to help the conception of new prophylactic and therapeutic interventions. The genome comprises 4,411,707 base pairs, contains around 4,000 genes, and has a very high guanine + cytosine content that is reflected in the biased amino-acid content of the proteins. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv (Broad) genome was sequenced at The Broad Institute and has a total of 4124 genes.

    Mycobacterium ulcerans AGY99

    Mycobacterium ulcerans AGY99

    Mycobacterium ulcerans AGY99 is an emerging pathogen that causes Buruli ulcer, a chronic, necrotic skin lesion in humans, and has rapidly emerged as an important cause of morbidity around the world. The prevalence of Buruli ulcer throughout West Africa appears to have increased dramatically since the late 1980s. Buruli ulcer is considered the third most common mycobacterial disease of non-immunocompromised persons after tuberculosis and leprosy. M. ulcerans is unlike other mycobacterial pathogens in that it appears to maintain an extracellular location during infection and produces a macrolide toxin, mycolactone. Despite several extensive investigations over the past 30 years, the mode of transmission of M. ulcerans has not been determined. It has been suggested that M. ulcerans is derived from M. marinum, an intracellular pathogen of fish and humans, commonly isolated from aquatic environments worldwide. Indeed, according to one hypothesis, M. ulcerans may have diverged recently from M. marinum by the recruitment of foreign DNA from the environment. The Mycobacterium ulcerans AGY99 genome was sequenced by The Institut Pasteur and has a total of 4160 genes.

    Mycobacterium vanbaalenii PYR-1

    Mycobacterium vanbaalenii PYR-1

    Members of the genus Mycobacterium have been proposed for use in the application of bioremediation processes since they can degrade a wide range of environmentally toxic chemicals, including high-molecular-weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Mycobacterium vanbaalenii PYR-1, a rod-shaped, nonmotile, non-sporulating bacterium was the first bacterium isolated by virtue of its ability to metabolize the PAH pyrene. M. vanbaalenii PYR-1 was isolated from well characterized site near the Harbor Island oil tank farm in the watershed of Redfish Bay near Port Aransas, TX for its ability to degrade pyrene as a sole source of carbon and energy. The genome sequence of M. vanbaalenii PYR-1 will allow us to begin to understand the PAH degradation pathway. The Mycobacterium vanbaalenii PYR-1 genome was sequenced by the US DOE Joint Genome Institute and has a total of 5979 genes.

    Streptomyces avermitilis MA-4680

    Streptomyces avermitilis MA-4680

    The interesting and important property of Streptomycetes bacteria is their ability of producing a variety of antibiotics such as Streptomycin, Erythromycin, Tetracycline etc. through complex secondary metabolic pathways. The antibiotics produced by them account for 60% of naturally-occurring antibiotics and are used as antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, anitiparasitic, immunosuppressant and antitumor medicines. Streptomyces avermitilis (or, Streptomyces avermectinius) MA-4680 is the producer of anthelmintic macrolide "avermectin" that was isolated by Omura et al. of the Kitasato Institute from the soil sample collected in Ito City, Shizuoka Pref. It has an unusually large genome of 9.02 Mb of high G+C content, which, similar to the cases of other bacteria belonging to the genus Streptomyces, exists as a linear chromosome. Both telomeres of a linear chromosome contain terminal inverted repeats and covalently binding terminal proteins. The Streptomyces avermitilis MA-4680 genome was sequenced by Kitasato University and has a total of 7673 genes.

    Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2)

    Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2)

    Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) is the model representative of a group of soil-dwelling organism with a complex lifecycle involving mycelial growth and spore formation. These microbes are notable for their production of pharmaceutically useful compound including anti-tumour agents, immunosupressants and over two-thirds of all natural antibiotics currently available. They are the main decomposers of chitin, the second most abundant polysaccharide in nature, in soil. Since streptomycetes use chitin as carbon and nitrogen sources, they are assumed to play a major part in the turnover of chitin in natural ecosystems. The Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) genome was sequenced by The Sanger Institute and John Innes Center using a clone-by-clone approach and has a total of 7825 genes.

    Corynebacterium diphtheriae NCTC13129

    Corynebacterium diphtheriae NCTC13129

    Corynebacterium diphtheriae is a gram-positive, non-spore forming, non-motile, pleomorphic rod causative agent of diphtheria, and biotype gravis strain NCTC13129 is a recent U.K. clinical isolate representative of an epidemic clone now circulating within the Eastern European region. Diphteria toxin, produced by C. diphtheriae, can cause myocarditis, polyneuritis, and other systemic toxic effects. Diphtheria is an infectious disease spreading from person to person by respiratory droplets from the throat through coughing and sneezing. The disease normally breaks out 2 to 5 days after infection and usually affects the tonsils, pharynx, larynx and occasionally the skin. Incidence range from 0.5 - 1 per 100,000 population in Armenia, Estonia, Lithuania and Uzbekistan, to 27 - 32 per 100,000 in Russia and Tajikistan. The Corynebacterium diphtheriae NCTC13129 genome was sequenced by The Sanger Institute and the WHO and has a total of 2272 genes.

    Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032

    Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032

    This organism is a well-studied rod-shaped, non-motile, gram-positive, facultative, non-sporulating soil bacterium of considerable importance in biotechnology, in particular for the fermentative production of L-amino acids for food and fodder industry. The name was originaly given for this species for its ability to produce significant quantities (>100 g per liter) of glutamic acid (glutamate), an important food enhancer that has a meaty taste and flavor. Corynebacterium glutamicum is currently used commercially to produce glutamate and other amino acids (L-lysine) and compounds. The first strain of the species was isolated in 1957 by S. Kinoshita and colleagues while searching for an efficient glutamate-producer. The Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032 was sequenced by Universitat Bielefeld and has a total of 3057 genes.

    Corynebacterium efficiens YS-314

    Corynebacterium efficiens YS-314

    Corynebacterium efficiens YS-314 (or AJ 12310, JCM 11189, DSM 44549) is very similar to the well known C. glutamicum that has been serving for the industrial production of L-amino acids, in particular L-glutamic acid (a million tons each year), for a long time. C. efficiens YS-314 can grow at temperatures above 40 ?C in contrast to C. glutamicum that grows at 30 ?C. This feature is quite beneficial for its industrial use, because fermenters to be used for its cultivation need to be cooled down only to a lesser extent for heat removal. Hence, it is said to be a Corynebacterium of the next generation.
    The genomic sequence information of this bacterium would be useful for the understanding of thermostability of various enzymes. It has been reported that, despite the similarity between the structures of C. glutamicum and C. efficiens enzymes, they contain distinct amino acid differences such as lysine to arginine, serine to alanine, and serine to threonine substitutions, respectively.
    The Corynebacterium efficiens YS-314 genome was sequenced by The National Institute of Technology and Evaluation, Biotechnology Center, Toyko and has a total of 2950 genes.

    Corynebacterium jeikeium K411

    Corynebacterium jeikeium K411

    Corynebacterium jeikeium K411 is a pathogenic, rod-shaped, motile, facultative lipophilic and multidrug resistant member of the human skin flora. The Coryneform bacteria are common inhabitants of healthy human skin and mucous membranes however C. jeikeium differs from other coryneforms by being pathogenic to humans and highly resistant to antibiotics. Although C. jeikeium is a significant opportunistic pathogen the presence of C. jeikeium in the hospital environment is probably the most clinically important aspect of the natural history of this organism. It has been recognized with increasing frequency as a serious nocosomial pathogen and is the most frequently recovered medically significant corynebacterial species in intensive care facilities. This species has been associated with bacterial endocarditis following cardiac surgery. Other nocosomial infections involving this organism are associated with immunocompromised patients with malignancies, in-place medical devices, breaks in the skin barrier, and therapy with broad-spectrum antibiotics. This K411 strain was isolated from the axilla of a bone marrow transplant patient. The Corynebacterium jeikeium K411 genome was sequenced by Universitat Bielefeld and has a total of 2120 genes.

    Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    The bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides, belongs to the alpha-subdivision of the Proteobacteria. This group of bacteria are among the most metabolically diverse organisms known, being capable of growing in a wide variety of growth conditions. For example, R. sphaeroides possesses an extensive range of energy acquiring mechanisms including photosynthesis, lithotrophy, aerobic and anaerobic respiration. It can also fix molecular nitrogen, synthesize important tetrapyrroles, chlorophylls, heme, and vitamin B12. It is rod-shaped, motile and facultative. It has extremely facile methodologies for genetic manipulations, gene transfer, genetic analyses, chromosomal mobilization, etc. In addition, R. sphaeroides 2.4.1 has been shown to detoxify a number of metal oxides and oxyanions and is the subject of ongoing studies on bioremediation. R. sphaeroides 2.4.1 is also the first free living bacterium known to utilize the regulatory systems associated with quorum-sensing. Other recent findings reveal that the methods of motility and environmental sensing in relation to bacterial taxis, and movement in R. sphaeroides, are unique both genetically and physiologically. This organism also possesses a number of traits and characteristics which show interesting similarities to those of the mammalian mitochondrion.
    There are several natural isolates of R. sphaeroides, and most of those currently identified as R. sphaeroides appear to possess two chromosomes. The R. sphaeroides 2.4.1 genome consists of two circular chromosomes, chromosome I (CI, ~3.0 Mbp), chromosome II (CII, ~0.9 Mbp), and five other replicons.
    The Rhodobacter sphaeroides genome was sequenced by The US DOE Joint Genome Institute and has a total of 4242 genes.

    Rhodococcus sp. RHA1

    Rhodococcus sp. RHA1

    Rhodococcus sp. RHA1 was isolated from soil contaminated with lindane and is known for its exceptional ability to degrade polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), a class of toxic and persistent pollutants. In addition to PCBs, Rhodococci degrade an unusually broad range of organic compounds, particularly hydrophobic xenobiotics, thus playing a key role in the global carbon cycle. The broad metabolic diversity of Rhodococcus makes them of a great interest to pharmaceutical, environmental, chemical and energy industries. Engineering microbial strains for biocatalysis and bioremediation involves genetic modification to introduce or suppress catabolic and/or regulatory activities. The global physiologic consequences of such modifications, both direct and indirect, are often poorly understood. Moreover, other physiological processes may have to be optimized for a bacterial strain to be effective in a particular application. Strain RHA1 is well suited for field applications as it tolerates environmental stresses, survives well in soil and can be genetically manipulated. The Rhodococcus sp. RHA1 genome was sequenced by The University of British Columbia and has a total of 9145 genes.

    Nocardia farcinica IFM 10152

    Nocardia farcinica IFM 10152

    The first aerobic actinomycete was discovered by Nocard in 1889 and named by Trevisan as Nocardia farcinica. Nocardia species are pathogenic, filamentous-shaped, sporulating, nonmotile, aerobic, gram-positive bacteria which grow in soils as well as animal tissues. Nocardia farcinica causes Nocardiosis which is an acute, subacute, or chronic infectious disease occurring in cutaneous, pulmonary, and disseminated forms. Primary cutaneous nocardiosis presents as cutaneous infection (cellulitis or abscess), lymphocutaneous infection (sporotrichoid), or subcutaneous infection (actinomycetoma). Pulmonary infection presents as an acute, subacute, or chronic pneumonitis, usually in immunocompromised hosts. Disseminated nocardiosis may involve any organ; lesions in the brain or meninges are most frequent. Since treatment for nocardiosis heavily relies on chemotherapy, their intrinsic multiple drug resistance is a serious problem. On the other hand, some species of Nocardia are known to produce antibiotics and aromatic compound-degrading or converting enzymes. Recently, Nemoto et al. discovered an antibiotic, asterobactin, from a clinical isolate. The genome consists of a single circular chromosome of 6,021,225 bp with an average G+C content of 70.8% and two plasmids of 184,027 (pNF1) and 87,093 (pNF2) bp with average G+C contents of 67.2% and 68.4%, respectively. The chromosome encoded 5,674 putative protein-coding sequences, including many candidate genes for virulence and multi-drug resistance as well as secondary metabolism. Analyses of paralogous protein families suggest that gene duplications have resulted in a bacterium that can survive not only in soil environments but also in animal tissues, resulting in disease. The Nocardia farcinica IFM 10152 was sequenced by The University of Tokyo and has a total 5683 genes.

    Acidothermus cellulolyticus 11B

    Acidothermus cellulolyticus 11B

    Acidothermus cellulolyticus (strain ATCC 43068 / 11B) is a moderately thermophilic, aerobic, cellulolytic bacterium originally recovered from the acidic hot springs of northern Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. The Acidothermus cellulolyticus 11B genome was sequenced by The US DOE Joint Genome Institute and has a total of 2157 genes.

    Bifidobacterium Longum NCC2705

    Bifidobacterium Longum NCC2705

    Bifidobacteria are strictly anaerobic microorganisms that are found as commensals in the mammalian gastrointestinal tract. Bifidobacterium longum keeps the digestive system running smoothly, blocks the growth of harmful bacteria, and boosts the immune system. The organism ferments sugars into lactic acid and has many health benefits for humans and is often the dominant bacterium found in humans. It is a gram-positive, anaerobic, branched rod-shaped bacterium. They predominate in infants' intestines and can represent up to 3% of the gut microbiota in adult humans. Together with lactobacilli, bifidobacteria are considered health-promoting bacteria and thus are used as food additives in the dairy industry. It is among the first to colonise the sterile digestive tract of newborns and predominates in breast-fed infants. Formula-fed infants have a different microflora, and this may be related to the higher risk of diarrhea and allergies in these babies. The Bifidobacterium Longum NCC2705 genome was sequenced by The Nestle Research Center, Lausanne and has a total of 1727 genes.

    Propionibacterium Acnes KPA171202

    Propionibacterium Acnes KPA171202

    Propionibacterium acnes is a major inhabitant of adult human skin, where it resides within sebaceous follicles, usually as a harmless commensal although it has been implicated in acne vulgaris formation. It is the most common gram-positive,non-spore forming, anaerobic rod encountered in clinical specimens. P. acnes typically grows as an obligate anaerobe, however, some strains are aerotolerant, but still show better growth as an anaerobe. It has the ability to produce propionic acid and catalase along with indole, nitrate, or both indole and nitrate. Propionibacterium resembles Corynebacterium in morphology and arrangement, but is non-toxigenic. The Propionibacterium Acnes KPA171202 genome was sequenced by Georg-August-University Goettingen and has a total of 2297 genes.

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra is an avirulent strain derived from the H37 strain which was isolated from a patient. This laboratory strain has since lost its virulence, and has different characteristics from its virulent sibling H37Rv including decreased ability to survive in macrophages or hypoxic conditions, and loss of virulence in laboratory animals. Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra was sequenced by the Chinese National Human Genome Center at Shanghai and has x genes.

    Mycobacterium gilvum PYR-GCK

    Mycobacterium gilvum PYR-GCK

    Mycobacterium gilvum is a soil bacterium capable of degrading pyrene and other aromatic hydrocarbons. This strain was isolated from river sediment, was sequenced by the DOE-Joint Genome Institute, and has x genes.

    Mycobacterium abscessus

    Mycobacterium abscessus

    Mycobacterium abscessus is a fast-growing mycobacterium and a common water contaminant. It can infect the lungs, wounds, and skin of humans, usually in individuals with compromised immune systems. M. abscessus was sequenced by Genoscope and has x genes.

    Mycobacterium africanum GM041182

    Mycobacterium africanum GM041182

    Mycobacterim africanum is most commonly found in West African countries and its symptoms of infection are similar to those of M. tuberculosis. Infection by M. africanum is an important opportunistic infection in immunocompromised patients, such as those with HIV. It was sequenced by Sanger, and has x genes.

    Mycobacterium JLS

    Mycobacterium JLS

    Mycobacterium JLS was isolated from soil in a wood preservative-contaminated area where degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) was occurring. It is fast-growing, Gram-positive, and has distinctive surface mycolic acid derivatives on its cell surface. M. JLS was sequenced by the DOE-Joint Genome Institute and has x genes.

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis RGTB327

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis RGTB327

    This strain was isolated from Kerala, a state in south India. The strain was part of a repository of field strains that had been made as a part of a drug screening program. The strain was isolated from sputum samples . See this paper for a complete description of this strain.

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis RGTB423

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis RGTB423

    This strain was isolated from Kerala, a state in south India. The strain was part of a repository of field strains that had been made as a part of a drug screening program. The strain was isolated from sputum samples. See this paper for a complete description of this strain.